Prevent, Promote, and Protect your Health with the Lake County General Health District
(440) 350-2543
5966 Heisley Rd
Mentor, Ohio 44060

Press Releases

newspaper
Please see the most current press release by date released.

2017

  • June 22, 2017For Immediate Release                                                                                                 CONTACT: Ron H Graham, (440) 350-2543June 22, 2017                                                                                                                   LAKE COUNTY GENERAL HEALTH DISRICT NEW MEDICAL DIRECTOR NAMEDBY LAKE COUNTY GENERAL HEALTH DISTRICTThe Lake County General Health District (LCGHD) is pleased to announce that Nora Colburn, MD, MPH has been named the new Lake County Medical Director. Dr. Colburn assumed her new role as Medical Director in early June 2017.This part-time position carries many responsibilities, including serving as the county Tuberculosis Clinic Physician, reviewing and updating medical standing orders as necessary, and direction concerning public health emergency planning.Dr. Colburn is currently a physician partner with ID Consultants in Beachwood, Ohio. She received her Medical Degree and Master of Public Health from Case Western Reserve University.Dr. Colburn provides inpatient consultation services in Infectious Diseases at Hillcrest Hospital and University Hospitals Ahuja Medical Center.   She provides outpatient consultation services for general Infectious Diseases and HIV medicine at her office in Beachwood, Ohio. She also serves as adjunct faculty for the Podiatric Medical Surgical Residency of University Hospitals. Dr. Colburn currently resides in Willoughby Hills in Lake County.Dr. Colburn noted, “I am honored to serve as the Medical Director of the Lake County General Health District. Lake County has strong public health programs and initiatives that are critical in controlling and preventing diseases in the community. I look forward to working with the excellent team at the Health District to continue to improve the health, safety, and well-being of the residents of Lake County.”The position of Medical Director is required by Ohio Revised Code Section 3709.11 A Medical Director must be a doctor of medicine or doctor of osteopathic medicine who is licensed to practice medicine in Ohio and can furnish medical direction of all LCGHD personal health and nursing services.More information on LCGHD and their programs and services can be found atwww.lcghd.org. ###

  • June 21, 2017NEWS RELEASE                                                                                                                                       CONTACT: Bert Mechenbier, (440) 350-2453June 21, 2017                                                                                                                                                LAKE COUNTY GENERAL HEALTH DISTRICTLAKE COUNTY GENERAL HEALTH DISTRICT TO BEGIN MOSQUITO SPRAY PROGRAM JUNE 26th Lake County General Health District (LCGHD) officials are expecting an increase in the number of mosquitoes in Lake County due to rain and high temperatures last week. Heavy rain can leave large areas of standing water where mosquitoes lay their eggs. If the weather cooperates, the LCGHD is planning to start spraying for mosquitoes the week of June 26th. It should take two weeks to complete the first round of spraying. The spray schedule is posted on the Health Districts website at: https://www.lcghd.org/?page_id=3926. The spray schedule is also available by calling (440) 350-2088 or (440) 918-2088.While there are currently no known cases of Zika virus (spread by mosquitoes) in Lake County, mosquitoes are also the source of West Nile Virus which is native to Lake County, as well as a nuisance.  “The best advice is to get rid of standing water around your house if you can and use personal protection against mosquitoes,” noted Bert Mechenbier, Supervisor of Mosquito Control at LCGHD.Mechenbier provided the following tips for homeowners to keep mosquitoes from breeding in your backyard:Dispose of tin cans, old tires, buckets, unused plastic swimming pools, plastic covers or other containers that collect and hold water.Keep roof gutters unclogged. Clean gutters in the spring and fall.Clean and chlorinate swimming pools, outdoor saunas, and hot tubs. Keep them covered when empty.Empty and change the water in bird baths, fountains, wading pools, rain barrels, and potted trays at least once a week, if not more often.Fill or drain puddles, ditches, and swampy areas and either remove, drain, or fill tree holes and stumps with mortar.Eliminate seepage from cisterns, cesspools, and septic tanks.Eliminate standing water around animal watering troughs.Irrigate lawns and gardens carefully to prevent water from standing for several days.LCGHD would also like to advise the following for protection against biting mosquitoes:Use an insect repellent containing  active ingredients which have been registered with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use as repellents applied to skin and clothing. Of the products registered with the EPA, those containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535, and some oil of lemon eucalyptus and para-menthane-diol products provide longer-lasting protection than other products.Use repellents according to label instructions.Insect repellents can be used on pregnant women. EPA does not recommend any additional precautions for repellent use by pregnant or nursing women..Most insect repellents can be used on children. Products containing oil of lemon eucalyptus should not to be used on children under the age of three years.. Do not allow children to handle or spray insect repellents. When using on children, apply to your own hands first and then put it on the child. Avoid applying repellent to children’s hands because children frequently put their hands in their eyes and mouths. EPA does not recommend any additional precautions for using registered repellents on childrenRepellents containing a higher percentage of the active ingredient typically provide longer-lasting protection. Regardless of what product you use, if you start to get mosquito bites, reapply the repellent according to the label instructions.Wash treated skin and clothing after returning indoors.Wear light-colored clothing.Wear long sleeved shirts, long pants, and socks if you go outside when mosquitoes are most active (from dusk until dawn).Avoid wearing perfume, cologne and aromatic scents.Make sure window and door screens are “bug tight”. Repair or replace torn screens.Replace outdoor lights with yellow “bug lights”.If you have a concern about standing water, please call the LCGHD at (440) 350-2543. If the standing water is on private property, permission will be needed to enter the property. ###

  • June 12, 2017NEWS RELEASE                                                                                                                         CONTACT: Bert Mechenbier, (440) 350-2453June 8, 2017                                                                                                                                   LAKE COUNTY GENERAL HEALTH DISTRICTLAKE COUNTY GENERAL HEALTH DISTRICT OFFICIALS EXPECTING AN INCREASE IN MOSQUITOESLake County General Health District (LCGHD) officials are expecting an increase in the amount of mosquitoes in Lake County due to forecasted high temperatures.   The rains over the past few weeks have left large areas of standing water where mosquitoes lay their eggs. While there are currently no known cases of Zika virus in Lake County, mosquitoes are also the source of West Nile Virus, which is native to Lake County, as well as a nuisance.  “The best advice is to get rid of standing water around your house if you can and use personal protection against mosquitoes,” noted Bert Mechenbier, Supervisor of Mosquito Control at LCGHD.Mechenbier provided the following tips for homeowners to keep mosquitoes from breeding in your backyard:Dispose of tin cans, old tires, buckets, unused plastic swimming pools, plastic covers or other containers that collect and hold water.Keep roof gutters unclogged. Clean gutters in the spring and fall.Clean and chlorinate swimming pools, outdoor saunas, and hot tubs. Keep them covered when empty.Empty and change the water in bird baths, fountains, wading pools, rain barrels, and potted trays at least once a week, if not more often.Make sure children’s toys are not holding water.Fill or drain puddles, ditches, and swampy areas and either remove, drain, or fill tree holes and stumps with mortar.Eliminate seepage from cisterns, cesspools, and septic tanks.Eliminate standing water around animal watering troughs.Irrigate lawns and gardens carefully to prevent water from standing for several days.LCGHD would also like to advise the following to protect yourself from biting mosquitoeLCGHD would also like to advise the following to protect yourself from biting mosquitoes:Avoid being outside at dawn/dusk. If you cannot avoid those times, use a repellent.Use an insect repellent containing  active ingredients which have been registered with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use as repellents applied to skin and clothing. Of the products registered with the EPA, those containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535, and some oil of lemon eucalyptus and para-menthane-diol products provide longer-lasting protection than other products.Use repellents according to label instructions.Insect repellents can be used on pregnant women. EPA does not recommend any additional precautions for repellent use by pregnant or nursing women..Most insect repellents can be used on children. Products containing oil of lemon eucalyptus should not to be used on children under the age of three years.. Do not allow children to handle or spray insect repellents. When using on children, apply to your own hands first and then put it on the child. Avoid applying repellent to children’s hands because children frequently put their hands in their eyes and mouths. EPA does not recommend any additional precautions for using registered repellents on childrenRepellents containing a higher percentage of the active ingredient typically provide longer-lasting protection. Regardless of what product you use, if you start to get mosquito bites, reapply the repellent according to the label instructions.Wash treated skin and clothing after returning indoors.Wear light-colored clothing.Wear long sleeved shirts, long pants, and socks if you go outside when mosquitoes are most active (from dusk until dawn).Avoid wearing perfume, cologne and aromatic scents.Make sure window and door screens are “bug tight”. Repair or replace torn screens.Replace outdoor lights with yellow “bug lights”.If you have a concern about standing water, please call LCGHD at (440) 350-2543. If the standing water is on private property, permission will be needed to enter the property. For general information on mosquitoes and mosquito control, please visit the LCGHD’s website at www.lcghd.org. ###

  • June 6, 2017NEWS RELEASE                                                                                                                                              CONTACT: CHRISTINE MARGALIS (440) 350-2879June 2, 2017                                                                                                                                                        LAKE COUNTY GENERAL HEALTH DISTRICT           Lake County Residents Invited to Complete Access to Care SurveyIn an effort to gain information on access to care issues in Lake County, Lake County General Health District (LCGHD) will be conducting a community survey open to Lake County residents ages 18 years of age or older. The survey can be accessed at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/2017AccesstoCare.The survey consists of 54 multiple choice questions, can be completed anonymously and takes approximately 15 minutes to complete. Question topics include health and dental insurance coverage as well as possible barriers to receiving care including cost, travel and lack of a personal physician or primary medical home. This survey is a first step in looking at strategies to improve access to care for Lake County residents. Focus groups will be also be conducted with specific groups including senior citizens, individual using behavioral health services and limited English-speaking populations. Information gathered will be used by healthcare stakeholders to identify underserved populations, close gaps in service and develop long-term solutions so that all Lake County residents can reach their full potential.“With continued discussions around amending the Affordable Care Act, now is an appropriate time to review how Lake County residents access healthcare in our community. Lake County is very fortunate to have several large hospital systems, as well as publicly funded providers working in our area. Yet there is still a significant population of our residents who are unable to access the timely services they need to maintain health,” said Ron H. Graham, Health Commissioner of the Lake County General Health District.The online survey will be open until July 15, 2017. The winner of a $50.00 Giant Eagle gift card will be selected amongst those who submit their name and contact information at the survey link above. Completion of the survey is not a requirement for entry into the drawing. For additional information, please contact Christine Margalis at (440) 350-2879. ###

  • May 26, 2017PRESS RELEASE                                                                                                     CONTACT: MICHELLE HART (440) 350-2464May 24, 2017                                                                                                             LAKE COUNTY GENERAL HEALTH DISTRICT LAKE COUNTY KICKS OFF LOCAL CLICK IT OR TICKET CAMPAIGN ON MAY 25, 2017The Lake County Safe Communities Coalition, in collaboration with the Painesville Farmers Market and law enforcement partners, will hold its local Click It or Ticket Campaign Kickoff on Thursday, May 25, 2017 at 12:00 p.m. at Veterans Park, 1 Liberty Street in Painesville. The presentation will take place at the gazebo. Speakers include Painesville Municipal Court Judge Michael Cicconetti, Lieutenant Charles Gullett of the Ohio State Highway Patrol, Chief Anthony Powalie of Painesville City Police Department, and Sheriff Daniel Dunlap or a representative from the Lake County Sheriff’s Office.“Currently Lake County has two traffic fatalities in 2017 and both were unrestrained. The focus of the Click It or Ticket Campaign is to bring awareness to the importance of seat belt usage, as many know the dangers but still refuse to buckle-up,” says Lake County Safe Communities Coalition Coordinator Michelle Hart. Painesville Police Chief Anthony Powalie adds, “Safety is planned for and injuries are preventable”.Click It or Ticket is a national enforcement mobilization that will be taking place across the country May 22 – June 4, 2017. The Click It or Ticket program began in North Carolina in 1993, which later expanded to include eight states in a regional campaign in 2001. Ohio became involved in a national pilot program in 2002 and, as of 2004, all States and U.S. territories participate in Click It or Ticket annually. The mobilization is supported by national and local paid advertising and earned media campaigns aimed at raising awareness. The primary audience continues to be men ages 18 to 34, which research shows are less likely to wear seat belts.In addition to the presentation, Lake County Safe Communities Coalition will be hosting a booth at the Farmers Market, engaging shoppers with the Seatbelt Safety Prize Wheel and providing a lunchtime snack. During the Farmers Market, Barrio Food Truck will be serving lunch and vendors such as Middle Ridge Gardens, Carhops Burger Sauce, Rainbow Farms, Backattack Almonds will be selling items. All news media, public officials and the general public are invited to attend. ###